Books I’ve Loved Lately

Books I’ve Loved Lately

I have always loved to read. One of my biggest regrets in life is losing a summer book reading contest in elementary school. I lost by one book to the librarian’s daughter (which, come on, not fair!). All jokes aside, I really do love to read and got back into my voracious habit during the quarantine months thanks to Becca and Grace of Bad on Paper podcast. I’ve got stacks of books all over the apartment that I’m working my way through. I’ve been updating my Goodreads (feel free to follow me!) but thought I would share some of my book highlights of the past few months. It’s been a lot of rom coms, royal-themed reads, and breezy books that don’t require too much thought but definitely leave you feeling attached.

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The Friday Five 11.27.20

The Friday Five 11.27.20

I hope you had a safe and fulfilling Thanksgiving yesterday! I stayed in my bubble to enjoy some delicious food, watch the Thanksgiving Day Parade (my favorite part is always the Broadway performances!), and relax with my latest read. Instead of a traditional Thanksgiving meal (which I hope we can all agree is not traditional based on the realities of 1620…), I created a menu of Asian-inspired dishes from the Dining In and Six Seasons cookbooks. Throw in some good wine and conversation, and it was the recharge I needed after spending my days on my psychiatry rotation. Here are some things that caught my eye this week!

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Two Interviews On My Journey to Medicine

Two Interviews On My Journey to Medicine

I had such a fun time talking about my journey to medicine with Jenn on the “How Did You End Up There?” podcast the other week! It’s definitely not typical to start out in politics and end up a (almost) physician, but I can’t imagine any other path. I learned many valuable lessons along the way and had the opportunity to delve into interests that I might not have as a pre-med at 18 or as a medical student in my early 20s. We sacrifice a lot to find the time to learn all we can to save and improve lives. You can listen to the episode here – be sure to check out all of the other episodes too! It’s so interesting to get glimpses into other winding career paths.

I was also interviewed by my medical school magazine about my interest in public health and advocacy as a medical student and future physician. As I mention in the article, it is so important for medical students (and all health professionals) to see beyond the four walls of the clinic. Our patients exist in vibrant communities and we have a responsibility to understand how their social interactions and environments impact their health. It’s the main reason I started this blog – to educate and empower the next generation of physicians to do the most good for their patients.

You can read more about my career change here!

What is Public Health?

What is Public Health?

Let’s start out by dispelling the misconception that physicians are trained in public health and therefore should be consulted as experts during public health crises. For the most part, this is NOT TRUE. Physicians are trained to provide medical care – to diagnose, treat, and manage individual health problems. While some medical schools do teach epidemiology (the science of public health), it is not enough to head out into the world as a public health professional. If you’re a physician with a Master of Public Health (like I will be!), then you certainly have more credibility to speak on matters of public health as a physician. And the reverse is true as well – experts in public health who did not go to medical school are not doctors! The medical and public health professions need to work together beyond times of crisis and both need to be consulted by policy makers. Doctors alone should not be asked how to contain a pandemic – simply put, we are not trained to give that advice.

So, let’s get into it. What exactly is public health?

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The Friday Five 11.20.20

The Friday Five 11.20.20

Happy Friday! We made it to the end of another week! I spent a few days finishing up child psychiatry and then started adult psychiatry. There is so much to learn to best help these patients manage their mental illnesses and I am doing my best to stay on top of the studying. And of course, it’s almost Thanksgiving! I know there is a lot of extra stress and anxiety around how to see family safely or if to see them at all. I listened to this podcast episode with Dr. Fauci and it gave me a lot to think about in terms of how we continue to protect ourselves and our loved ones. And here are a few (well, five) other things I enjoyed this week!

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We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This

We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This

And by this, I mean every six months.

But then again, we’ve never lived through a global pandemic for months on end while trying to still live our lives, so I hope you’ll forgive me.

Since I was last here, a lot has happened. I moved back to Miami to start my third year of medical school and after months sitting at home studying for Step 1 (so long, farewell forever!), I was finally able to be in the hospital seeing patients! I started with 10 weeks of internal medicine and hopped between two general inpatient rotations, outpatient primary care, hepatology (liver) clinic, and the cardiology inpatient service. I learned the bread and butter of medicine during those 10 weeks — heart failure, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, infectious disease, liver failure…you name it, I probably saw at least one patient with it. The shift from learning for a multiple choice test to applying it to real patients was a struggle. One minute you have to pick the correct anti-hypertensive for your fake vignette patient, the next it’s a real patient with financial concerns, comorbidities, and a history of medication side effects. All in all, I am happy I started my year off with internal medicine. It offered such a breadth of experiences caring for patients admitted to the hospital, patients needing clinic follow-up for chronic conditions, or specialty care. It set me up perfectly for my next rotation, family medicine.

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Supreme Court to Rule on Access to Abortion in Louisiana

Down in New Orleans in 2016

I would say “how has it been 6 months since I posted here?!” but then again, I know that happened – the last semester of my second year of medical school and Step 1 happened. So here I am, 6 months later, getting back on the horse. I’ve still been posting over on Instagram, but I’m also just getting back to posting there after a break for my dedicated Step 1 study period.

A while back, I posted on my Instagram stories about oral arguments at the Supreme Court for June Medical Services v. Russo and asked if folks wanted to learn more about the role of the judiciary in abortion care. After hearing a resounding yes, I’m finally getting around to it. This was initially intended to be a post on IG, but the judicial system and processes that go with it are *complicated* to say the least and resulted in a post that was far too long. So I’m going to share here instead.

At first I thought I’d work my way forward from Roe v. Wade to today, but it seems more relevant to start in the present and look back to see how we got here. This post is going to look at the specifics of June Medical (and I’ll update it as soon as there is a decision!) and then forthcoming posts will look at Roe, Casey, Whole Woman’s Health (in more detail than presented here), and others.

So let’s head down to the land of beignets and jambalaya and get to it.

The Supreme Court is due to hand down a decision any day now in June Medical Services. At issue in the case is this: does the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit’s to uphold Louisiana’s law requiring physicians who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a local hospital conflict with the Supreme Court’s 2016 ruling in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt.

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Health Care Sharing Ministries

Last week, Washington State fined one of the larger health care sharing ministries $150,000 and banned it from offering its product in the state because it was operating as an unauthorized insurer. Other states are warning consumers to watch out for these plans, which can look like insurance but are not.  Health care sharing ministries (HCSMs) are organizations in which members share common religious or ethical beliefs and agree to make payments to (or share) the medical expenses of other members.

The groups originated in the 1980s in small religious communities and were exempted from following coverage guidelines mandated by the ACA. An estimated 1 million people belong to a HCSM, up from 200,000 before the ACA was passed a decade ago. 

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When We Know Better, We Can Do Better

How much does your doctor know about health policy and how it impacts you as a patient?

Unfortunately, not enough. Medical students are given little to no knowledge on how policy and politics influence the system we will train and ultimately practice in.

I’ve already written about this a few times, so check out this post on engaging in advocacy as a medical student, this one about integrating health policy in medical school, and this post on how medical schools are failing students on health policy.

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