When We Know Better, We Can Do Better

How much does your doctor know about health policy and how it impacts you as a patient?

Unfortunately, not enough. Medical students are given little to no knowledge on how policy and politics influence the system we will train and ultimately practice in.

I’ve already written about this a few times, so check out this post on engaging in advocacy as a medical student, this one about integrating health policy in medical school, and this post on how medical schools are failing students on health policy.

Continue reading “When We Know Better, We Can Do Better”

Engaging in Advocacy as a Medical Student

I wanted to write this post last week, but I had to play some serious catch-up with school work instead. I shared a little bit about the conference I attended in D.C. and the amazing celebs I met (!!) but I wanted to let you in about why I attended in the first place and why I think more medical students should be engaged in advocacy.

Prior to medical school, I worked at a policy non-profit in D.C. for three years. Part of my job included meeting with Congressional staff and legislators and running workshops to give high schoolers and adults the skills to be an advocate at the local, state, and federal level. I loved teaching about the basics of government, a little bit about a policy issue, and giving some tips for effective advocacy. [I’ll be back soon with my tips for effective advocacy!]

Continue reading “Engaging in Advocacy as a Medical Student”

Day in the Life MS1: Cardiovascular System

The “pre-clinical” years of medical school are pretty similar at most medical schools — anatomy, basic science courses, and organ modules. No matter how the curriculum works, you spend a lot of time watching lectures and studying in the library. I only have two weeks left of our cardiovascular system module and then it’s Spring Break and our last module of MS1, Neuroscience and Behavioral Science! I had a busier than usual day earlier this week and thought I’d take you through it!

I like to schedule book and video reviews into my daily calendar to make sure I don’t forget!

6:30am Wake up feeling refreshed for the first time in over a week! Grab a big mug of coffee and finish a blog post about exercise and my career change.

Continue reading “Day in the Life MS1: Cardiovascular System”

Post Bacc Basics + How it Prepared Me for Medical School

I need to thank the Clare at Fitting It All In for blogging about her experiences in a post bacc premed program. When I learned that this type of program existed for people like me — career-changers who wanted to go to medical school (or other biomedical or health sciences careers) with no science background — I got onto Google and typed in “post bacc premed blog.” Her site was one of the first to come up! Now I’m in medical school after five years in the professional and graduate school worlds, a year in a post bacc, and a glorious year spent as a nanny for the cutest two year old. So, I think it’s time to pay it forward.

Every post bacc is structured a bit differently, but they’re all geared towards to same outcome: complete the basic prerequisites for medical school admission, immerse yourself in medicine (to varying extent at different programs), prepare for the MCAT, and have an advisor to guide you through the application process. This last point is why I decided to pursue my coursework in a post bacc program as opposed to a DIY situation at a community college — with the added bonus that I could do it all in one year. (Some post bacc programs are two years; mine had the option of a one or two year track.)

I also got to do some awesome things outside of class — like learn to suture!
Continue reading “Post Bacc Basics + How it Prepared Me for Medical School”

The Impact of Advertising on Food Choices

Nutrition education is lacking in most health professions education — either isn’t incorporated, exists in the context of specific disease-related diets, or glosses over the concept of nutrition and diet. Honestly, it’s understandable considering how much knowledge needs to be conveyed and learned — especially in medical school, the only health profession I can speak to personally. But, just as I’ve written before about the need to incorporate more health policy education, it’s time to also offer more discussions about nutrition and the vast impact of society and policy on the “what” and “where” people eat. [Also just as important is proper education on eating disorders. This post from my friend Clare of Fitting it All In is a great overview about caring for individuals with eating disorders.]

Fast-food kids meals advertise toys to specifically target children.

Obesity is common, costly, and poses serious health risks. So let’s start with some numbers to get our bearings about why this topic warrants our attention:

Continue reading “The Impact of Advertising on Food Choices”

How I Keep Up With Health Policy Happenings

I may have hit snooze a few times this morning, but eventually I rolled out of bed, made some coffee, and started my morning routine of skimming the news and some journals for about 30 minutes before diving into my study tasks for the day.

I wish I could make this for myself. Italians just do coffee better.

I planned to post a short recap of this mornings offerings on Instagram, but there were just too many great reads that I wanted to share. Here is a brief glimpse at what I’m reading this morning [if I told you what was on every open tab, we’d be here until tomorrow morning]:

Continue reading “How I Keep Up With Health Policy Happenings”

On a Scale of Pass to Fail, Many Medical Schools Fail Students on Health Policy

The U.S. Capitol is a site of health policy discussion and legislative action.

We are in a time when physicians are increasingly speaking the language of health policy and public health — “value-based care,” “co-payment,” “social determinants of health,” “accountable care organization” — and are increasingly asked by patients to ensure that a particular treatment or procedure is covered by their insurance before moving forward. This dizzying list of health policy terms (and the responsibility of a physician to understand the lingo) just keeps growing. And there is no better time to introduce students to this world than in medical school, when they are primed for learning and not yet overwhelmed with patient care.

Continue reading “On a Scale of Pass to Fail, Many Medical Schools Fail Students on Health Policy”